Kindle App Academic Possibilities

After seeing, with some envy, what a colleague could do on her iPad 2, I decided I wanted to find out more about the academic usefulness of what I could do with the books I read on my Kindle app on my Galaxy Tab. I started adding highlights and notes on a book I was currently reading.

  • I held my finger on the text where I wanted to start and a box appeared with the text coloured blue. (It sometimes took a couple of tries to get the exact text.)
  • I continued dragging my finger, and the box enlarged, spreading the blue text, to where I wanted to stop.
  • When I lifted my finger, up popped a three-choice menu – “Note | Highlight | More …” and I tried “Highlight”, and the chosen text gained a yellow highlight.
  • When I chose “Notes” I was able to add my comments.

Good – I had notes and highlights, just like I would when I read a paper book, used a highlighter and added annotations. But how to see them! I clicked on the far left icon under the screen and got to chose “My Notes & Marks” –

Galaxy Tab Kindle App Menu
Galaxy Tab Kindle App Menu

which gave me this –

Galaxy Tab Kindle App Notes
Galaxy Tab Kindle App Notes

I played around for a while, but couldn’t figure out how to transfer or copy this information within my Tab. So …

A vague memory of my collection of e-books being available on my laptop led me to my laptop and my Amazon account where, after I looked around a bit, I discovered I could download a Kindle App for Macs onto my laptop. So I did.

Next, I googled “Kindle ‘print annotations'” which got me some information about a “Clippings file” that didn’t help me, but gave me the idea that I could open the book I was making notes on using my synced Kindle app on my laptop. After some more searching around, I found a reference to “kindle.amazon.com/your_highlights” and, when I went there and logged into my Amazon account, I found, in full, all my highlighted passages and notes –

Laptop Kindle App Notes
Laptop Kindle App Notes

I promptly copied and pasted all of these into a Word document. Now I was ready for some academic writing!

Perhaps I had to take some more time than my colleague with her iPad 2 to set up my system, but I now have an easy way to collect quotes and notes for academic essays and articles using my Kindle app reading of e-books.

 

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